My Favorite Eye Exercise

My Favorite Eye Exercise

Do you have a child who is struggling to read?  Often it is because of weak eye muscles. Each of our eyeballs are held in place with six muscles.  What do you think would happen if one or more of those eyes muscles was weak?

For one thing, it would make moving your eyes across a page difficult.  Just like training for a marathon, you can exercise these eye muscles so they can be strong.  Of course, this alone probably won’t help your child’s reading skills, but it is a step in the right direction.  The great news?  This has nothing to do with intelligence.

You can do a quick check with your child to see if his/her eye muscles are weak.  Buy an eye patch.  You can get one at a pharmacy or get one from Amazon.  You will also need a tongue depressor.  Draw a big dot on the top of it.

Patch one of your child’s eyes.  Hold the tongue depressor about six to eight inches away from the unpatched eye.  Move the tongue depressor around in slow circular movements and have your child follow the dot on the stick with the unpatched eye.  Your job is to watch your child’s eye.  Does it twitch, jump, or move jerkily?  Does your child’s eye water?  These are indications of weak eye muscles.  Repeat the process with the other eye, watching for the same weaknesses.

Once you determine that your child’s eye muscles might be weak, you can do this same exercise every day.  You can add diagonal movements and a lazy eights.  Watch your child’s eyes to see if the movements become more fluid.  Be sure to do both eyes, even if one doesn’t seem to be weak.

Once the eye muscles are strengthened, you can move to a maintenance program where you only have to do the exercise once a week and then once a month.

Soon, your child will be reading, and this in turn leads to learning success!


Lisa

Do you have a child who is struggling to read?  Often it is because of weak eye muscles. Each of our eyeballs are held in place with six muscles.  What do you think would happen if one or more of those eyes muscles was weak?

For one thing, it would make moving your eyes across a page difficult.  Just like training for a marathon, you can exercise these eye muscles so they can be strong.  Of course, this alone probably won’t help your child’s reading skills, but it is a step in the right direction.  The great news?  This has nothing to do with intelligence.

You can do a quick check with your child to see if his/her eye muscles are weak.  Buy an eye patch.  You can get one at a pharmacy or get one from Amazon.  You will also need a tongue depressor.  Draw a big dot on the top of it.

Patch one of your child’s eyes.  Hold the tongue depressor about six to eight inches away from the unpatched eye.  Move the tongue depressor around in slow circular movements and have your child follow the dot on the stick with the unpatched eye.  Your job is to watch your child’s eye.  Does it twitch, jump, or move jerkily?  Does your child’s eye water?  These are indications of weak eye muscles.  Repeat the process with the other eye, watching for the same weaknesses.

Once you determine that your child’s eye muscles might be weak, you can do this same exercise every day.  You can add diagonal movements and a lazy eights.  Watch your child’s eyes to see if the movements become more fluid.  Be sure to do both eyes, even if one doesn’t seem to be weak.

Once the eye muscles are strengthened, you can move to a maintenance program where you only have to do the exercise once a week and then once a month.

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